Among details we love this week, this is holding a special place in our hearts and concrete eyes.  Spotted on Ignant.

Peter Haimerl. Photo credit Clemens Poloczeck/Ignant

Peter Haimerl. Photo credit Clemens Poloczeck/Ignant

This is a design story of how German Architect Peter Haimerl converted a Cobbler farmhouse dating back to 1705, which had been empty for the last 30 years, into a dynamic space which amplifies historical features, seemingly absent.

Peter Haimerl. Photo credit Clemens Poloczeck/Ignant

Peter Haimerl. Photo credit Clemens Poloczeck/Ignant

While the exterior of the house stayed untouched, the internal space, which had been gutted, provided the groundbreaking studio the perfect playground to create an avant guard space where prisms meets false ceilings, with an interesting choice of materials.

Well, we used concrete for the standard reasons: That’s to say, it’s a very high quality building material, without being gendered, so to speak. That’d be completely inappropriate. We wanted to reflect the tradition of the area, the farming lifestyle. Concrete is also very easy to deal with. And the second material, felt. reflects the original details of the building as it was first built, its warmths and these bright layered colours. Concrete provides a nice contrast to this, it brings out the historical elements well. Peter Haimerl
— Ignant magazine

Peter Haimerl also creatd a dung motif, to symbolize the intrinsic prosperity by the pile, in a farm setting.

It somehow represented prosperity: The more crap, the more the cows have to eat. A small pile of dung meant things weren’t going so well. I really like this idea, and secondly, the dung pile has to be replenished, so taken down to the field when it’s empty, and in this way it becomes a kind of motif in and of itself. Peter Haimerl
— Ignant

Definitely a property to Stay a while in. 

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